Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the executive editor of The American ProspectHis email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

The First Thanksgiving, Trickle-Down Version

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
(AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Donald Trump pardons Drumstick during the National Thanksgiving Turkey Pardoning Ceremony at the White House on November 21, 2017. trickle-downers.jpg A nd it came to pass that in their second year in the New Land, the Pilgrims enjoyed a bountiful harvest. Some said that it was the Savage Indians who taught the Pilgrims which crops would flourish in the New Land’s Strange Soil, though others disputed that (see-eth below). And it came to pass that to celebrate the harvest, the Leader of the Pilgrims, Venerable Donald, also known to his Pilgrim Brothers as “the Shining Hairpiece on the Hill,” decreed a Feast of Thanksgiving. And both the Pilgrims and the Savage Indians brought heaping portions of food to Venerable Donald to distribute for the Feast. “Cook it well,” Venerable Donald commanded. “When I eat-eth turkey, I like it well cooked.” “And when thou grab-eth pussy, thou likest it rare?” piped up Goody Wiseacre, whom the Pilgrims burned for her Witchery the...

The GOP’s Suburban Collapse

(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
(AP Photo/Cliff Owen) Supporters celebrate news that Ralph Northam has won the gubernatorial election, during the election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax on November 7. T hree years ago, when he ran for the U.S. Senate against incumbent Democrat Mark Warner, Republican politician Ed Gillespie carried the big Washington, D.C., semi-suburban, semi-exurban Loudoun County by a narrow margin. Last night, running for governor against Democrat Ralph Northam, he lost it by 20 percentage points. The Loudoun result epitomizes the Revolt of the Anti-Trump suburbs, which not only yielded a surprisingly large 9-point victory for Northam but may even have enabled the Democrats to win a majority, or come damned close to it, in the commonwealth’s House of Delegates—which required a pick-up of 17 seats in the 100-seat house. No one was expecting that. To be sure, Gillespie won by Trumpian margins in Virginia’s rural southwest, but like most of rural America, this is a region that is...

My Man Martov

Public Domain
Public Domain Julius Martov, center, in 1917 with fellow Menshevik Party leaders Pavel Axelrod, left, and Alexander Martinov, right, in Stockholm. O ne hundred years ago today—November 7, 1917—the Bolsheviks took power in Russia in an almost bloodless coup against a government that no longer could claim any supporters. Probably no more than 10,000 Bolshevized soldiers, sailors, and workers participated, seizing key governmental institutions in Petrograd and arresting the ministers of the feckless provisional government. There were no more than a handful of casualties. By contrast, the February Revolution that had overthrown the Tsar had involved hundreds of thousands of participants in an unplanned series of demonstrations, and the number of casualties exceeded one thousand. The Bolsheviks’ seizure of power was deliberately timed by Lenin to immediately precede the convening of the national Congress of Soviets—the bodies of worker, peasant, soldier, and sailor representatives that had...

The Left and Ralph Northam

AP Photo/Steve Helber Democratic gubernatorial candidate Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, left, waves to the crowd as Governor Terry McAuliffe applauds during a rally in Richmond V irginia’s gubernatorial race is tightening. According to a Washington Post poll the lead Democrat Ralph Northam holds over Republican Ed Gillespie has narrowed from 13 points earlier this month to just five points. The poll makes clear that Gillespie has consolidated support among the Old Dominion’s Trump supporters: 95 percent of those voters favor Gillespie. Northam though has failed to reel in a comparable share of voters who disapprove of Trump: 81 percent of the anti-Trump electorate back him. The numbers suggest that some Republicans who dislike Trump are nonetheless voting for Gillespie—a more conventional Republican and seemingly more normal human being than the president (admittedly, a low bar to clear) Gillespie’s challenge has been to win over the party’s Trumpian base. To that end, his...

The Top-Sideways Revolt of the Anti-Trump Republicans

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite Senator Bob Corker speaks with reporters as he walks to the Senate floor B ack in the 1970s, I belonged to a small left-wing group that enjoyed minor successes and major failures in recruiting new members. We did very well at enlisting the top leaders of large organizations, unions in particular. We didn’t do well at all when it came to recruiting the rank-and-file members of those organizations. All of which led my friend Jim Chapin to comment, “We’re not even organized top-down. We’re organized top-sideways.” Chapin’s line, it seems to me, is a pretty fair description of today’s anti-Trump Republicans. Some of the GOP’s pre-eminent political leaders—George W. Bush, John McCain, Bob Corker, Jeff Flake—have made clear their belief that President Trump is a pox on the Republican Party, the United States, and common decency. So have many of the country’s most prominent conservative writers, including George Will, Michael Gerson, Ross Douthat, Jennifer Rubin...

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